Summer Things

summer049

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Some neat things that happened this summer:

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Touring with Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros / The Giving Tree Band

Album 1 / Album 2

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Photos featured in this JamBase article

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Second year in a row as a finalist in the Photographer Forum Magazine's "Best of Photography 2013" contest

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Photos featured in Colorado's Summit Daily Paper [online & in print]

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And announcing that I will be a Los Angeles- based photographer as of October.

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lots of love.

Rogers Park & Other Things

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I constantly find myself bring reminded how quickly time escapes (have you noticed this blog-wide theme?), this is not helped by the fact that more often than not, I have no idea what time or day or date it is.  I could almost be convinced that New Year's Eve was just two weeks ago because the memory seems so recent and so fresh that it feels impossible for ten and a half months to have passed.

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Is the increasingly unstoppable speed of time what growing up really is?

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Regardless, I have worked myself into and out of a bit of a rut the past month. I had a steady flow of inspiration but a very consistent lack of motivation, it was nothing that a bit of will power couldn't turn around.  Now that I'm up and at 'em again, I've begun work at a project that has been on my mind since moving to Chicago over four years ago and has changed format a few times, with the intention remaining the same. The focus of the project is that of the neighborhood I've lived in exclusively during my time in this city: Rogers Park. Before moving to Chicago, I was totally unaware of the neighborhoods and how the city was divided up. It just never occurred to me. My at-the-time boyfriend and I spent a great deal of time trying to decide on apartments while he was abroad and I, though at a close five hours away, had absolutely no idea what I was looking at. Through the help of a friend, we secured a tiny place in Rogers Park.

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Then my research began. I became obsessed with the neighborhood--reading about every single documented business, learning the history, discovering the neighborhood landmarks. I knew before even stepping foot within it's boundaries that I was going to fall in love with Rogers Park. It is way up north, it does have a bit of shady history, and it's certainly not as gentrified as the others. But it's incredibly diverse; in fact it's one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the entire country. And it's beautiful, stunningly so. I could go on and on about how wonderful it is, truthfully. Though the words won't do it justice. For the past four years, this neighborhood has provided ample inspiration and a safe haven, and all I want to do is reciprocate by showing the subtle pieces that create this amazing Chicago anomaly.

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In the meantime, here are some other things to check out.

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I participated in a RAW event at  Double Door in Chicago and my video interview from the evening is up here.

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As I mentioned in the previous post, I was at the House of Blues Chicago for the Giving Tree Band's album release show. *Most* of the photos are up on Flickr; I'm still working on processing and scanning in the film but those should be up soon as well.

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I took a road trip to Memphis with my brother in September and absolutely fell head over heals for the whole city. I was absorbing so much of it that I didn't take a great number of photos but what I did take, you can see here.

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That's all for now, there isn't any more.

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Movement

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The young man, going out of his town to meet the adventure of life, began to think but he did not think of anything very big or dramatic. Things like his mother’s death, his departure from Winesburg, the uncertainty of his future life in the city, the serious and larger aspects of his life did not come into his mind.

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He thought of little things —Turk Smollet wheeling boards through the main street of his town in the morning, a tall woman, beautifully gowned, who had once stayed overnight at  his father’s hotel, Butch Wheeler the lamp lighter of Winesburg hurrying through the streets on a summer evening and holding a torch in his hand, Helen White standing by a window in  the Winesburg post office and putting a stamp on an envelope.

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The young man’s mind was carried away by his growing passion for dreams. One looking at  him would not have thought him particularly sharp. With the recollection of little things occupying his mind he closed his eyes and leaned back in the car seat. He stayed that way for a long time and when he aroused himself and again looked out the car window the town of  Winesburg had disappeared and his life there had become but the background on which to paint the dreams of his manhood.

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— Sherwood Anderson, “Winesburg, Ohio”

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I snatched this excerpt from a blog linked to a project that one of my favorite photographers, Alec Soth, has been working on.  Having just returned from several weeks upon the road and gearing up for another adventure on the west coast, this selection seemed to resonate with me...  I feel as though it's a common notion, perhaps in naivety or simply soaked in romanticism, that travel and exploration will bring clarity to the scenery of one's 'big picture'. But I don't believe this is truly the case. We may slowly develop a better understanding of humanity, but I think that unless your journey revolves around the service of others, there is no lasting sense of lucidity... There is a deep particle of our being that remains the same, focusing on the trivial and inane, that cannot truly be altered through movement but, alternately, is only adaptable in stillness. I don't know if my feelings are even remote to what this paragraph reflects but it added fuel to thoughts I've been entertaining about a (few years away) project that will simultaneously that reflect both the culture of motion and the surrounding quietness that transitions one.

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In the meantime, I am happy to announce that next month, I will be participating in an Chicago event showcasing artists of varying mediums. I'll have more details to share soon, but keep the 23rd open.

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Blessings.

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Setting the Stage

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Holy smokes, it's already June.  This year has been one wild ride so far and it seems I've only been on the incline of this roller coaster--you know, the part where your heart is racing as you try to anticipate what's going to come next before reaching that pivotal point at the top where the ride really begins...  But more on that another time.

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April and May have been rather quiet months for me and with good reason. Well, maybe bad reason, I don't know, but some reason for sure.  After returning from London at the beginning of April, I spent some time in California visiting my father and then traveled throughout Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. This upcoming month is bound to be just as mobile, but I'm setting off with the intention of better documentation and more frequent updates, as to prevent those cobwebs from finding home around here.

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Anyway.

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There are some very exciting things in motion here at Cats Like Scotch and I am really looking forward to sharing that with you all. But not today. Today you just get an ominous title and vague allusions. In the upcoming weeks, you will get a vacation photo tutorial and at least two new additions to the Artistry Project as well as some tips on the extended nomadic lifestyle. Then, after all that: the news. ;)

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Blessings.

 

(PS: Did you know that Cats Like Scotch is both on Facebook and Instagram @catslikescotch?! Be sure to follow, like, or check out for more frequent updates and fun discoveries. )

 

 

Cold, Cold Rain

I would like to share with you my debut video. It's entitled "Cold, Cold Rain" and is a music video for the first single off of The Giving Tree Band's upcoming fourth album [Vacilador].  I've always had a fascination with Mexican folk art so to be able to explore that realm a bit while collaborating with GTB on this video was a great experience. I truly poured my heart into creating this and hope you enjoy! .